Monday, February 15, 2010

Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982)

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Actress. She was an international star of films, television and on the stage. Ingrid Berman made 50 films in her movie career winning two best Actress Oscars, an Emmy and a Golden Globe Award. Some of her films: Intermezzo, Casablanca, Walk in the Spring Rain, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, For Whom the Bell Tolls, Gaslight, The Bells of St. Mary's, Joan of Arc, Anastasia and Murder on the Orient Express. Debuting on Broadway, she stared in Anna Christie and after an absence from the stage returned to play Joan of Arc winning her a Tony Award for Best Actress. Her third Academy Award was for Best Supporting Actress in Murder on the Orient Express. She was a regular on television and won an Emmy for the miniseries, "The Turn of the Screw." Diagnosed with breast cancer and despite failing health, she continued to work culminating in her last acting role in a TV miniseries, "A Woman Called Golda" where she won both an Emmy and a Golden Globe Award. On her 67th birthday she hosted a small gathering at her home in London in honor of her birthday. Later that day, she died peacefully in her sleep from the complications of cancer losing a seven-year battle with the disease. She was cremated. Her urn was buried beside her parents in Stockholm, Sweden. Ingrid Bergman was born in Stockholm, Sweden to a father who owned a photography shop and a German mother. During her formative years she became orphaned and was passed on to an array of relatives due to death eventually ending her teenage years with an uncle. She made her professional stage debut after attending the Royal Dramatic Theater School in Stockholm. She is remembered most for her bad marriage choices and indiscretions and even her banning from America in the face of scandal. However: Her storybook success as an actress where she never gave a bad performance nor made a bad movie is her legacy. The movie " Bells of St Mary's" where she was nominated for an Oscar playing the part of a Mother Superior has become an American classic.

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